Frequently Asked Questions

ENTRY / EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR U.S. CITIZENS: You need a valid passport to enter Serbia. U.S. citizens do not need visas to stay in Serbia for up to 90 days within a 180-day period. If you wish to stay in Serbia longer than 90 days during any 180-day period, you must apply for a temporary residence permit at the local police station with authority over the place you are staying in Serbia. You cannot apply for a residence permit outside of Serbia. To apply for a temporary residence permit, you must provide a copy of your birth certificate, marriage certificate (if applicable) and an official police report from your state of residence in the United States or from law enforcement authorities in the country where you permanently reside, if outside of the United States. You must obtain the police report no more than 90 days before you apply for your residence permit. All of your documents should have an “apostille” stamp from the government office where you obtained the document. To learn more about apostilles and other official documents, please see our judicial assistance note.

Visit the Embassy of Serbia website for the most current visa information. If you have specific questions about visas, residency or work permits, please contact the Serbian Embassy in Washington, D.C.

Embassy of the Republic of Serbia
2134 Kalorama Road
Washington, D.C. 20008
Phone: (202) 332-0333 Fax: (202) 332-3933
Email: info@serbiaembusa.org

Serbia also has Consulates General in Chicago and New York City. Both Consulates provide information on travel and long-term stays in Serbia

Serbian Consulate General in Chicago
201 East Ohio Street
Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: (312) 670-6707 Fax: (312) 670-6787
Email: info@srbchicago.org

Serbian Consulate General in New York City 
62 West 45th Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Phone: (212) 596-4241 Fax: (212) 596-4363
Email: office@serbiaconsulatenyc.com

When you arrive in Serbia, the immigration police should stamp your passport. Please make sure to obtain an entry stamp when you enter Serbia, and be careful not to lose it; it is proof that you entered Serbia legally and starts the clock on the 90 days you can stay in Serbia legally without a visa. If you get a new passport while you are in Serbia, you must keep the old passport with the entry stamp to prove that you are in the country legally. If you lose your stamped passport, the Serbian police will not permit you to leave the country until you obtain an exit visa from the Ministry of Interior. If you use different passports or other forms of identification to enter and exit Serbia (for example, entering with a Serbia passport or Serbian “National ID Card,” then attempting to exit with a U.S. passport) the immigration police might not be able to ascertain that you entered Serbia legally and they may hold you for questioning. We advise that you enter and leave Serbia with the same passport.

Serbian immigration police do not recognize the authority of Kosovo’s government, borders, or immigration officers. Travelers coming to Serbia by land through Kosovo have had problems with Serbian border authorities at checkpoints on the borders between Kosovo and Serbia. Serbian immigration police have refused to accept travelers’ Kosovo entry stamps, claiming that the travelers were in Serbian territory illegally, and do not permit them to travel any farther into Serbia. If you are planning to travel by land to Serbia, you can avoid this situation by entering the country through one of its non-Kosovo border-crossing stations.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Serbia.
Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on travel.state.gov. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

SMART TRAVELER ENROLLMENT PROGRAM (STEP) / EMBASSY LOCATION: If you plan to visit or live in Serbia, please take the time to tell our Embassy about your trip. If you enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, we can keep you up to date with important safety and security announcements, and can help your friends and family get in touch with you in an emergency.

On January 17, 2001, the U.S. Government issued an Executive Order discontinuing all business sanctions imposed on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, which at the time included what is now the Republic of Serbia. However, trade is still prohibited with 82 individuals, primarily indicted war criminals and former close associates of the Milosevic regime. To obtain a list of the 82 individuals, contact the Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treasury Department at (202) 622-2490.

U.S. exporters should be aware that most technology can be exported from the United States to Serbia under general export licenses. Some equipment (e.g. dual-use technology) still requires valid export licenses from the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) (formerly the Bureau of Export Administration) at the U.S. Department of Commerce. For more information about export licenses, contact BIS at (202) 482-4811.

Please direct inquiries regarding contacting Serbian officials to the Embassy of Serbia. Their contact information is:

2134 Kalorama Road., NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
Phone (202) 332-0333
Fax (202) 332-3933
Email: info@serbiaembusa.org
Website: www.serbiaembusa.org/

Serbia also has Consulates General in Chicago and New York City.

Serbian Consulate General in Chicago
201 East Ohio Street
Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: (312) 670-6707 Fax: (312) 670-6787
Email: info@srbchicago.org

Serbian Consulate General in New York City 
62 West 45th Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Phone: (212) 596-4241 Fax: (212) 596-4363
Email: office@serbiaconsulatenyc.com